What If I Told You Your Doctor Was Depressed…

There he was, curled up in the corner of the room. Sitting by himself. He said no words when questioned about his day. Instead, he wandered off into space, staring through the window.

A few friends of ours mentioned he had changed! They said, “he acts different now”. “He won’t come to hang-outs with us anymore” was always the reason they gave for no longer inviting him to dinners. His girlfriend said she was concerned, but maybe he will get over it one day.

That one day never came!

This is a true depiction of clinical depression. The first time I encountered depression was as a medical provider. Later in life, I saw its manifestation in friends, colleagues, and family members. I have personal stories of my own, but the stories of my friends have impacted my life.

Depression is a mood disorder that causes a persistent feeling of sadness and loss of interest. 

Mayoclinic

So, what if I told you- Your doctor suffers from depression? Would you believe me? I hope you do! No one is immune to depression. In fact, I did some research on the prevalence and incidence of depression in Physicians during the COVID pandemic. As previously mentioned, Healthcare workers are experiencing tremendous stress. It is no surprise that this population is also affected by depression.

Statistics on COVID-19 and Doctors

Front-line doctors face a mental health crisis amid coronavirus. Can  medicine overcome the culture of stoicism? - ABC News
Astonishing fact on Depression and Anxiety amongst Physicians

There is so much work to be done in recognizing depression and in receiving appropriate care for depression. Often, we look at the outward appearance of others and make quick assessments. We may tell ourselves that because they are doctors, they have no problems. But, the reality is far from our first assessment.

One of the roles of my blog is to highlight the shortcomings of the healthcare system and to humanize physicians and those in the healthcare authority positions. Too often, there appears to be a barrier between a patient’s experience and the experiences of a physician.

However, one thing unites us all. WE ARE ALL HUMAN, as such our experiences and challenges are similar.

Let’s Highlight Signs and symptoms of Depression

  1. Prolonged Sadness
  2. Feeling a sense of hopelessness
  3. Anhedonia (loss of desire for things you find pleasure before)
  4. Suicidal ideation
  5. Changes in weight and appetite

Additional Signs and Symptoms . If you or anyone you know are experiencing any of these signs or symptoms of depression, please contact your healthcare provider. If you are having thoughts of suicide, below find contact information for National Suicide Hotline in New York City. Telephone #
800-273-8255

How to Manage Depression

Depression is treated and managed through multiple modalities. It is recommended to use a combination of medication(s) (SSRIs, SNRIs, mood stabilizers) and psychotherapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and/or behavioral therapy.

Wellness Tips

Courtesy of MentalHealthPlatform

Closing Thoughts

Anyone can be affected by depression. The next time you are visiting your family doctor’s office, consider that they also need someone to check-in on them.

Like I always say, we are all a work in progress. Until next time, let us be kind to each other.

Connect with us on Instagram @- JAARABLOG

Follow, Like and Comment below. Have you had any experience with depression?

How are you feeling today?

8 Comments

  1. This is so powerful coming from someone in the medical world. We often forget that our health care providers are human too. They need as much care and love as we do. Thank you for this!

    Excellent work!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Depression doesn’t respect age, class, status, background, race, etc. In fact, healthcare professionals including physicians such as psychiatrists are not immune to it. It is a situational crisis and we all need to be vigilant and seek help swiftly.

    Liked by 1 person

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